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7 Quick Tips for Writing B2B Video Scripts


“I can’t wait to see how excited everyone is going to be about this B2B video script,” said NO ONE. EVER. B2B shouldn’t stand for “Boring 2 Boring.” B2B videos don’t have to be boring! In fact, B2B videos have the highest opportunity for conversions because of how dry 98% of scripts produced are. If you have the right mindset, you can make your B2B video easily stand out from the competition with these 7 tips.

  1. Don’t write your script like a college essay. Write conversationally. 
    • This can be difficult for many people since we have had the rigid rules of essay writing ingrained in us since grammar school. Writing conversationally exists outside the rules of regular punctuation and sentence structure. To help with this, record a conversation between you and friend and then try writing it down afterwards to see what it looks like on paper. Obviously, it will be a bit too casual for script form but it will give you some idea of where to start.

     

  2. All information does not to be contained in the video alone. 
    • This is probably the worst sin that can be committed and the one that happens the most. Remember, video is simply one of the tools at your disposal to communicate. Save super dry information for brochures and web pages. Video is the prime tool to get your audience emotionally invested. By loading it with too many facts and complexities, it often renders the video watered down and useless.

     

  3. Avoid cliches.
    • Words like “synergy,” and “innovative solutions” do not belong in a B2B script. You are still writing for people. Think of writing it in the style of a B2C script with some industry terminology sprinkled throughout.

     

  4. Get the first draft out as fast as possible.
    • This is the hardest part of the writing process. I often agonize over the first draft because I am a perfectionist of sorts when it comes to video scripts. Ignore all of that and try and knock out a script as fast as humanly possible. After that you will want to revise, revise, revise. Scripts can go through as many as 5-10 revisions before it reaches the screen.

     

  5. Read your script out loud. 
    • This will help you tighten your script and work on the pacing. Remember, humans take time to digest information. If you spend time loading your entire script with language then it won’t be as efficient. Think in clear, efficient language and use empty space as your secret weapon.

     

  6. Show, don’t tell. 
    • This is probably my biggest gripe about B2B writing. Instead of convincing people of something through visuals or clever word play, we have settled with using phrases like “best in class.” Think of it this way: Would you be more convinced if I told you that “I am the strongest man in the world,” or if I walked outside and lifted an 18-wheeler over my head? People are inherently skeptical and you have to convince them on your message before you lazily declare it.

     

  7. Read these books. 
    • The following books have shaped how I approach writing in a groundbreaking way. Initially, I was trained as a screenwriter. This was key in helping me create characters and ideas that would hook in an audience. Later in my career, it was people like Luke Sullivan and David Ogilvy who gave me the confidence to write in the B2B market space. Ogilvy has a very analytical approach while Sullivan extols the virtues of creating intrigue and delight in your audience. I guarantee you that if you read these books, your script writing ability will never be the same.
    • Save the Cat – Blake Snyder
    • The Screenwriter’s Bible – David Trottier
    • Ogilvy on Advertising – David Ogilvy
    • Hey Whipple Squeeze This – Luke Sullivan
    • The Adweek Copywriting Handbook – Joseph Sugarman

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